1. scinerds:


A Black Hole Overflows (NASA, Chandra, 2/2/09) (by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center)

NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has helped create a spectacular view of Centaurus A that shows the effects of a supermassive black hole. At the center of this nearby galaxy, a central black hole powers jets and lobes that flare against a background of stars and stardust. In the upper left of the image, an X-ray jet extends about 13,000 light years away from the black hole. The material in that jet is travelling at about half the speed of light.
Image credit:X-ray: NASA/CXC/CfA/R.Kraft et al.; Submillimeter: MPIfR/ESO/APEX/A.Weiss et al.; Optical: ESO/WFI

Read more/larger images:chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2009/cena/
Learn more about Chandra:www.nasa.gov/chandra/

    scinerds:

    A Black Hole Overflows (NASA, Chandra, 2/2/09) (by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center)

    NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has helped create a spectacular view of Centaurus A that shows the effects of a supermassive black hole. At the center of this nearby galaxy, a central black hole powers jets and lobes that flare against a background of stars and stardust. In the upper left of the image, an X-ray jet extends about 13,000 light years away from the black hole. The material in that jet is travelling at about half the speed of light.

    Image credit:
    X-ray: NASA/CXC/CfA/R.Kraft et al.; Submillimeter: MPIfR/ESO/APEX/A.Weiss et al.; Optical: ESO/WFI

    Read more/larger images:
    chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2009/cena/

    Learn more about Chandra:
    www.nasa.gov/chandra/

    (via dendroica)

  2. discoverynews:

Measuring A Tiny, But Mighty, Black Hole

One topic that people always ask astronomers about is black holes. These seemingly mysterious and bizarre objects are known to gobble up everything around them, even light, and physics as we know it cannot accurately describe what goes on inside.From the outside, however, we consider black holes to be pretty simple objects, described completely by their mass, or size, spin and charge. This is often called the “no-hair” theorem of black holes.For the most part, something that massive is almost certainly neutral, so astronomers really only care about how big a black hole is and how fast it is spinning.As you might imagine, actually measuring these quantities can be a bit tricky.

As news of the biggest black hole found yet hits, Nicole Gugliucci explains how they are measured.

    discoverynews:

    Measuring A Tiny, But Mighty, Black Hole

    One topic that people always ask astronomers about is black holes. These seemingly mysterious and bizarre objects are known to gobble up everything around them, even light, and physics as we know it cannot accurately describe what goes on inside.

    From the outside, however, we consider black holes to be pretty simple objects, described completely by their mass, or size, spin and charge. This is often called the “no-hair” theorem of black holes.

    For the most part, something that massive is almost certainly neutral, so astronomers really only care about how big a black hole is and how fast it is spinning.

    As you might imagine, actually measuring these quantities can be a bit tricky.

    As news of the biggest black hole found yet hits, Nicole Gugliucci explains how they are measured.

Melani Sub Rosa © by Rafael Martin