1. This is an Icelandic waterfall called Litlanesfoss and the naturally occurring rock formation is columnar jointed basalt. (via Kotkke: Hexagonal rocks)

    This is an Icelandic waterfall called Litlanesfoss and the naturally occurring rock formation is columnar jointed basalt. (via Kotkke: Hexagonal rocks)

  2. staceythinx:

    Beautiful aerial photography of a river draining into the ocean from a volcano in Iceland by Andre Ermolaev

  3. mineralia:

Calcite from Namibia
by Dan Weinrich

    mineralia:

    Calcite from Namibia

    by Dan Weinrich

  4. mineralia:

Pyromorphite from Spain
for auction by Exceptional Minerals

    mineralia:

    Pyromorphite from Spain

    for auction by Exceptional Minerals

  5. mineralia:

Azurite and Malachite from Arizona
by Exceptional Minerals

    mineralia:

    Azurite and Malachite from Arizona

    by Exceptional Minerals

  6. mineralia:

Amethyst included with Lepidocrocite by the Arkenstone

    mineralia:

    Amethyst included with Lepidocrocite by the Arkenstone

  7. mineralia:

Chalcopyrite with Dolomite from Missouri by Dan Weinrich

    mineralia:

    Chalcopyrite with Dolomite from Missouri by Dan Weinrich

  8. mineralia:

Chalcopyrite with Dolomite from Missouri by Dan Weinrich

    mineralia:

    Chalcopyrite with Dolomite from Missouri by Dan Weinrich

  9. mineralia:

Elbaite with Lepidolite from Brazil by Dan Weinrich

    mineralia:

    Elbaite with Lepidolite from Brazil by Dan Weinrich

  10. geologise:


The Door To Hell

The Derweze area is rich in natural gas. While drilling in 1971, Soviet geologists tapped into a cavern filled with natural gas. The ground beneath the drilling rig collapsed, leaving a large hole with a diameter of 70 metres (230 ft). To avoid poisonous gas discharge, it was decided to burn it off. Geologists had hoped the fire would use all the fuel in a matter of days, but the gas is still burning today. Locals have dubbed the cavern “The Door to Hell”.

    geologise:

    The Door To Hell

    The Derweze area is rich in natural gas. While drilling in 1971, Soviet geologists tapped into a cavern filled with natural gas. The ground beneath the drilling rig collapsed, leaving a large hole with a diameter of 70 metres (230 ft). To avoid poisonous gas discharge, it was decided to burn it off. Geologists had hoped the fire would use all the fuel in a matter of days, but the gas is still burning today. Locals have dubbed the cavern “The Door to Hell”.

Melani Sub Rosa © by Rafael Martin